Lukowiak-J

Last year I tore my patellar tendon and the doctor informed me of a long road ahead. I was initially sent to another rehab center by the doctor’s office. After several months, I couldn’t get any better. The doctor performed surgery to complete the repair. Then along comes Mike who asked to help me. When I came in, I could barely move my knee. His team took charge. They were incredible from start to finish. From Sara at the front desk, to Emily and Mike for pushing me back to form. 4.5 months after surgery I was back to skiing.  5 months I was back to running and playing soccer. All I can say is amazing things. I would recommend any here. You’re in great hands

- Jeff
Harty-A

I came to PT because I had pain in my heels due to my inflexibility in my hips and hamstrings. Since coming to PT I have dramatically reduced the pain in my heels and my flexibility has increased due to the great exercises I was shown. Now I can score more goals in soccer!

- Aidan

Washington Timbers Soccer

As the Exclusive Wellness Partners of the Washington Timbers Football Club, Peak Motion is prepared to help your athletes recovery from and prevent soccer-related injuries this season.  Be on the lookout for educational seminars for both coaches and parents on injury prevention, identification of common soccer related injuries and how to best recover from these injuries to minimize lost playing time or worsening of the injury.

 

ImPACT Baseline Testing

U.S. Soccer now mandates ImPACT baseline testing for Development Academy level players.  Peak Motion has teamed up with the Washington Timbers FC to administer testing.  Testing is performed on-site at Peak Motion P.T. in group and individual sessions.  Please see the links below to learn more about the benefits of participating in baseline testing and best practices for concussion management.

Soccer Injury Prevention

Soccer is one of the most popular sports in the world and the fastest growing team sport in the United States. Although soccer provides an enjoyable form of aerobic exercise and helps develop balance, agility, coordination, and a sense of teamwork, soccer players must be aware of the risks for injury. Injury prevention, early detection, and treatment can keep kids and adults on the field long-term.

Injuries to the lower extremities are the most common in soccer. These injuries may be traumatic, such as a kick to the leg or a twist to the knee, or result from overuse of a muscle, tendon, or bone.

 

How to prevent soccer injuries

  • Have a pre-season physical examination and follow your doctor’s recommendations
  • Hydrate adequately — waiting until you are thirsty is often too late to hydrate properly
  • Maintain proper fitness — injury rates are higher in athletes who have not adequately prepared physically.
  • After a period of inactivity, progress gradually back to full-contact soccer through activities such as aerobic conditioning, strength training, and agility training.
  • Avoid overuse injuries — more is not always better!

 

Many sports medicine specialists believe that it is beneficial to take at least one season off each year. Try to avoid the pressure that is now exerted on many young athletes to over-train. Listen to your body and decrease training time and intensity if pain or discomfort develops. This will reduce the risk of injury and help avoid “burn-out”

Common soccer-related injuries

Knee Sprain / Strain
Sprains refer to injuries of the ligaments (connect bone to bone) and strains refer to injuries of the muscles or tendons (connect muscle to bone). Sprains and strains occur from quick over-stretching of the tissues causing micro-tearing and subsequent injury. Swelling begins as part of the inflammation process, causing pain and difficulty with movement.

The first step in treating sprains or strains in the knee is to rest, ice and elevate it. With severe limitations in movement you should see our physical therapists right away. There are different levels of sprain or strain from mild to severe. In some cases, the tearing can be complete and even be in need of surgical repair.

How physical therapy helps
In most cases, physical therapy can effectively help you recover from a sprain or strain. We first evaluate the injured area to determine the extent of the injury and ensure that the ligaments or tendons are still intact. After we pinpoint the injured area, we formulate a treatment plan that will quickly relieve your swelling, pain and begin restoring range of motion.

The goal of physical therapy is to restore your normal range of motion and eventually restore normal strength. If you participate in sports or are very active, we work closely with you to make sure that we help you fully recover and can participate in those activities you love to do. Call us today to discover how we can effectively treat your sprains or strains.

About Meniscus Injury
The meniscus is a ring of cartilage on the lower part of the knee (the tibial plateau) that the end of the large femur bone rides on. The meniscus is responsible for providing cushioning and stability of the knee joint while guiding movement. It is connected on the outer edges to the thick ligaments around the knee. The inside part of knee (medial meniscus) bears more weight and often sustains more damage than the outside part (lateral meniscus).

The meniscus is supposed to be smooth to ensure good gliding of the knee when it is bending. With injuries, poor alignment or weak musculature, the meniscus can become bruised and even torn. The outside edges of the meniscus have more blood flow than the inner portions. This means, depending on the area were the damage is located the healing process can be slow.

Many times, meniscus injuries are mild to moderate and can be rehabilitated with physical therapy. However, at times surgical intervention may be necessary to clean and shave down the torn areas of the meniscus. Physical therapy is very important in the full recovery after this surgical procedure.

How physical therapy helps
Physical therapy is a very important part of recovering from a meniscus injury. Most injuries are mild and involve small tears, bruising or irritation. Physical therapy can pinpoint where there are limitations in movement of the knee joint and weakened musculature support. By pinpointing the mechanisms of injury, our treatments can focus on reducing your pain and swelling quickly. Then, we focus on improving your range of motion, joint mobility and strengthening to make sure your meniscus receives the necessary support.

If surgery is necessary, we work closely with your physician and the rehabilitation protocol. The primary focus is on eliminating swelling quickly, resolving pain, improving range of motion, restoring normal walking and strengthening the supporting muscles around the knee. We then show you what to do to maintain a healthy knee with physical activities and sports. Call us today to see how we can help you recover quickly from a meniscus injury.

About Knee Tendonitis
The ending of the word “itis” is defined as inflammation. Therefore, tendonitis is inflammation of a tendon, which connects muscles to bones. Commonly, the tendon that connects your quadriceps muscle to the tibia bone (patella tendon) can become inflamed. This thick tendon runs over the top of your kneecap and attaches to the tibia bone below. This patella tendon can often become inflamed due to abnormal joint movements, poor posture and weakness of the surrounding musculature. This causes strain to the tendon with resulting pain during repetitive movement and especially with squatting or kneeling down. Other areas of tendonitis in the knee can occur such as the back, outside or inside of the knee.

How physical therapy helps
Physical therapy is the first line in conservative treatment for tendonitis. Most tendonitis is due to underlying abnormal mechanics of movement, walking and weakness. Our trained physical therapists are experts in evaluating your movement to pinpoint the source of the trouble. Modalities may be used to alleviate pain and discomfort, while hands-on therapy improves joint mechanics and movement.

Finally, gentle strengthening exercises and joint coordination exercises help to restore stability to the affected area and prevent re-occurrence of symptoms. To discover how we can help your knee tendonitis call us today!

About Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Tears
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is an important ligament that checks the forward sliding of the tibia bone on the femur bone in the knee. This ligament can be injured with sports or falls, especially with blows to the knee from the side, while the foot is planted on the ground.

The ACL can be sprained which means it is still intact. If ruptured it is completely broken. When an ACL injury involves a sprain, there is typically swelling that occurs in the knee and a feeling of instability with walking. Sprains are classified according to their severity, with grades 1 through 3. Grades 1 and 2 are often treatable without surgery, while grade 3 is most often a complete tear and typically requires surgery.

With a sprain, the ligament is overstretched and micro-tearing results, causing pain and inflammation. There is little blood flow to the ligaments and they get most of their nutrition from the joint fluid. This means, that their healing is a lot slower than most other tissues. Depending on the severity of the sprain and joint stability the potential for future injury can increase.

With grade 3 ACL tears, surgery is most likely needed to repair. Physical therapy is vital to the rehabilitation after this surgery. Recovery does take time and the goal is to protect the surgery site, maintaining stability while getting back into walking and eventually running.

How physical therapy helps
Our physical therapists work with patients of all ages, especially those who have sustained ACL tears through sports activities. We work closely with your physician to examine the stability of your knee after the ACL injury. There are specific tests that we perform to assess how stable the ligament is and what course of action is best to resolve your pain and return you to activities as soon as possible. Most grade 1 and grade 2 sprains can be rehabilitated without the need for surgery and our physical therapists will discuss your options.

If surgery is needed for your recovery, rest assured that you are in the right hands for your rehabilitation. We work closely with your physician’s rehabilitation protocols. The priority is to manage your pain and swelling after surgery and gradually increasing your range of motion in the knee per your post-surgery protocol.

As time progresses, we work to gain your strength back in the knee, improve stability of the joint, get you back to walking normally and eventually back into advanced movements, including running. Call us today to discover how we can help you bounce back after an ACL tear.

About Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) Tears
The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is an important ligament that checks the backward sliding of the tibia bone on the femur bone in the knee. This ligament can be injured with sports or falls, especially with blows to the front of the knee while the foot is planted on the ground.

The PCL can be sprained which means it is still intact. If ruptured it means it is completely broken. When a PCL injury involves a sprain, there is typically swelling that occurs in the knee and a feeling of instability with walking. Sprains are classified according to their severity with grades 1 through 3. Grades 1 and 2 are often treatable without surgery, while grade 3 is most often a complete tear and typically requires surgery.

With a sprain, the ligament is overstretched and micro-tearing results, causing pain and inflammation. There is little blood flow to the ligaments and they get most of their nutrition from the joint fluid. This means, that their healing is a lot slower than most other tissues. Depending on the severity of the sprain and joint stability the potential for future injury can increase.

With grade 3 PCL tears, surgery is most likely needed to repair. Physical therapy is vital to the rehabilitation after this surgery. Recovery does take time and the goal is to protect the surgery site, maintaining stability while getting back into walking and eventually running.

How physical therapy helps
Our physical therapists work with patients of all ages, especially those who have sustained PCL tears through sports activities. We work closely with your physician to examine the stability of your knee after the PCL injury. There are specific tests that we perform to assess how stable the ligament is and what course of action is best to resolve your pain and return you to activities as soon as possible. Most grade 1 and grade 2 sprains can be rehabilitated without the need for surgery and our physical therapists will discuss your options.

If surgery is needed for your recovery, rest assured that you are in the right hands for your rehabilitation. We work closely with your physician’s rehabilitation protocols. The priority is to manage your pain and swelling after surgery, gradually increasing your range of motion in the knee per your post-surgery protocol.

As time progresses, we work with you to gain your strength back in the knee, improve stability of the joint, get you back to walking normally and eventually back into advanced movements including running. Call us today to discover how we can help you bounce back after a PCL tear.

About Medial Cruciate Ligament (MCL) Tears
The medial cruciate ligament (MCL) is an important ligament that checks the side to side sliding of the femur bone on the tibia bone in the knee. This ligament can be injured with sports or falls, especially with blows to the outside of the knee while the foot is planted on the ground. It is common for the MCL to be injured along with the medial meniscus.

The MCL can be sprained which means it is still intact. Ruptured means it is completely broken. When a MCL injury involves a sprain, there is typically swelling that occurs in the knee and a feeling of instability with walking. Sprains are classified according to their severity with grades 1 through 3. Grades 1 and 2 are often treatable without surgery, while grade 3 is most often a complete tear and typically requires surgery.

With a sprain, the ligament is overstretched and micro-tearing results, causing pain and inflammation. There is little blood flow to the ligaments and they get most of their nutrition from the joint fluid. This means, that their healing is a lot slower than most other tissues. Depending on the severity of the sprain and joint stability the potential for future injury can increase.

With grade 3 PCL tears, surgery is most likely needed to repair. Physical therapy is vital to the rehabilitation after this surgery. Recovery does take time and the goal is to protect the surgery site, maintaining stability while getting back into walking and eventually running.

How physical therapy helps
Our physical therapists work with patients of all ages especially those who have sustained MCL tears through sports activities. We work closely with your physician to examine the stability of your knee after the MCL injury. There are specific tests that we perform to assess how stable the ligament is and what course of action is best to resolve your pain and return you to activities as soon as possible. Most grade 1 and grade 2 sprains can be rehabilitated without the need for surgery and our physical therapists will discuss your options.

If surgery is needed for your recovery, rest assured that you are in the right hands for your rehabilitation. We work closely with your physician’s rehabilitation protocols. The priority is to manage your pain and swelling after surgery and gradually increasing your range of motion in the knee per your post-surgery protocol.

As time progresses, we work with you to gain your strength back in the knee, improve stability of the joint, get you back to walking normally and eventually back into advanced movements including running. Call us today to discover how we can help you bounce back after a MCL tear.

About Lateral Cruciate Ligament (LCL) Tears
The lateral cruciate ligament (LCL) is an important ligament that checks the side to side sliding of the femur bone on the tibia bone in the knee. This ligament can be injured with sports or falls, especially with blows to the inside of the knee while the foot is planted on the ground.

The LCL can be sprained which means it is still intact. If it is ruptured it means it is completely broken. When a LCL injury involves a sprain, there is typically swelling that occurs in the knee and a feeling of instability with walking. Sprains are classified according to their severity with grades 1 through 3. Grades 1 and 2 are often treatable without surgery, while grade 3 is most often a complete tear and typically requires surgery.

With a sprain, the ligament is overstretched and micro-tearing results, causing pain and inflammation. There is little blood flow to the ligaments and they get most of their nutrition from the joint fluid. This means, that their healing is a lot slower than most other tissues. Depending on the severity of the sprain and joint stability the potential for future injury can increase.

With grade 3 LCL tears, surgery is most likely needed to repair. Physical therapy is vital to the rehabilitation after this surgery. Recovery does take time and the goal is to protect the surgery site and maintaining stability while getting back into walking and eventually running.

How physical therapy helps
Our physical therapists work with patients of all ages, especially those who have sustained LCL tears through sports activities. We work closely with your physician to examine the stability of your knee after the LCL injury. There are specific tests that we perform to assess how stable the ligament is and what course of action is best to resolve your pain and return you to activities as soon as possible. Most grade 1 and grade 2 sprains can be rehabilitated without the need for surgery and our physical therapists will discuss your options.

If surgery is needed for your recovery, rest assured that you are in the right hands for your rehabilitation. We work closely with your physician’s rehabilitation protocols. The priority is to manage your pain and swelling after surgery and gradually increasing your range of motion in the knee per your post-surgery protocol.

As time progresses, we work with you to gain your strength back in the knee, improve stability of the joint, get you back to walking normally and eventually back into advanced movements including running. Call us today to discover how we can help you bounce back after a LCL tear.

About Knee Pain
The knee is the most complex joint in the body. It has to bear the weight of the body while moving through an incredible range of 130 degrees or more. When running the knee absorbs up to 6 times the weight of your body in force! In a lifetime, it is estimated that the average person will take over 216 million steps and walk 108,000 miles. With this amount of use, at times things can go wrong and lead to knee pain.

Most knee pain stems from the loss of what is called “accessory motions”. Accessory motions are the knee’s smaller movements that are sliding side-to-side, back and forth as well as spinning and rotating. Without consistent stretching and especially without being very active, the tissues around the knee become tight. In addition, if the muscles in the front or back of the knee become weaker, that can lead to more abnormal forces on the knee joint.

All of these problems lead to increased friction and wear on the knee. The normal response is one of inflammation that can be felt as pain in and around the knee. A good rule of thumb is that if your pain is achy, a lack of normal joint fluid flow is occurring as well as possible decreased circulation around the knee to the muscles and tissues. However, with sharp pain during movement, an area in the knee is being severely pressed upon and the movement of the joint is not normal.

How physical therapy helps
Physical therapy is one of the most important treatments for knee pain. Whether it is from a sports injury, tight musculature, altered joint mechanics or arthritis, we can help!

The first step is to pinpoint the exact mechanism of why your knee pain is occurring. We perform a thorough evaluation of your posture, knee motion, knee and hip strength, walking analysis and joint mobility. From this we can discover the main reason for your knee pain and formulate a treatment plan that will alleviate it quickly.

Our physical therapists perform hands-on therapy to improve your knee joint mobility, reducing pain quickly. Modalities such as ultrasound may be used to reduce swelling and pain. Specific exercises will be performed to enhance your leg strength and address any unbalanced muscles that are contributing to your knee pain. Call us today to find out how we can quickly and effectively alleviate your knee pain!

About Knee Post-surgery Rehab
Other types of surgeries for the knee are fracture repairs or ligament / tissue repair from trauma. The amount of force it takes to break bone means that the soft tissues around the knee are most likely significantly injured also. After surgery, due to limited movement, range of motion is lost as well as strength. Since walking is a very complex action of different muscles moving in a coordinated fashion, it can be difficulty to walk after a knee surgery.

How physical therapy helps
Physical therapy is an important part of the rehabilitative process after a knee surgery. Depending on your surgery and your physician’s protocols, we gently progress you through a structured rehabilitation program. The goal is to restore pain-free range of motion in the knee while maintaining surgery recovery protocols. Finally, walking coordination, balance and strength are improved so you can return to normal pain-free walking. Call us today to learn more about our post-surgery rehabilitation program.

About Osgood-Schlatter Disease

Osgood-Schlatter disease is pain below the kneecap that occurs in children and adolescents experiencing growth spurts during puberty.  It most often affects those who participate in sports that involve running, jumping, bending and changes of direction — such as soccer, basketball, volleyball, figure skating and ballet.  During these activities your child’s thigh muscles (quadriceps) pull on the tendon that connects the kneecap to the shinbone.  This repeated stress can cause the tendon to pull away from the shinbone a bit, resulting in the pain and swelling associated with Osgood-Schlatter disease. In some cases, your child’s body may try to close that gap with new bone growth, which can result in a bony lump at that spot.

Age ranges differ by sex because girls experience puberty earlier than boys. Osgood-Schlatter Disease typically occurs in boys ages 13 to 14 and girls ages 11 to 12.  The condition usually resolves once the child’s bones stop growing but may require treatment until that time to relieve pain and allow the athlete to return to competition.  Abnormal joint movements, poor posture and weakness of the surrounding musculature can contribute to increased strain to the tendon and growth plate during repetitive movement like running and jumping.

How physical therapy helps
Physical therapy is the first line in conservative treatment for Osgood-Schlatter’s Disease. Commonly, this condition is exacerbated by underlying abnormal mechanics of movement, walking and muscle weakness. Our trained physical therapists are experts in evaluating your movement to pinpoint the source of the trouble. Modalities may be used to alleviate pain and discomfort, while the Astym treatment can stimulate healing and hands-on therapy can improve joint mechanics and movement.

Finally, gentle strengthening exercises and joint coordination exercises help to restore stability to the affected area and prevent re-occurrence of symptoms. To discover how we can help your Osgood-Schlatter’s pain CALL US TODAY!