Lukowiak-J

Last year I tore my patellar tendon and the doctor informed me of a long road ahead. I was initially sent to another rehab center by the doctor’s office. After several months, I couldn’t get any better. The doctor performed surgery to complete the repair. Then along comes Mike who asked to help me. When I came in, I could barely move my knee. His team took charge. They were incredible from start to finish. From Sara at the front desk, to Emily and Mike for pushing me back to form. 4.5 months after surgery I was back to skiing.  5 months I was back to running and playing soccer. All I can say is amazing things. I would recommend any here. You’re in great hands

- Jeff
Harty-A

I came to PT because I had pain in my heels due to my inflexibility in my hips and hamstrings. Since coming to PT I have dramatically reduced the pain in my heels and my flexibility has increased due to the great exercises I was shown. Now I can score more goals in soccer!

- Aidan

Washington Timbers Soccer

As the Exclusive Wellness Partners of the Washington Timbers Football Club, Peak Motion is prepared to help your athletes recovery from and prevent soccer-related injuries this season.  Be on the lookout for educational seminars for both coaches and parents on injury prevention, identification of common soccer related injuries and how to best recover from these injuries to minimize lost playing time or worsening of the injury.

 

Soccer Injury Prevention

Soccer is one of the most popular sports in the world and the fastest growing team sport in the United States. Although soccer provides an enjoyable form of aerobic exercise and helps develop balance, agility, coordination, and a sense of teamwork, soccer players must be aware of the risks for injury. Injury prevention, early detection, and treatment can keep kids and adults on the field long-term.

Injuries to the lower extremities are the most common in soccer. These injuries may be traumatic, such as a kick to the leg or a twist to the knee, or result from overuse of a muscle, tendon, or bone.

 

How to prevent soccer injuries

  • Have a pre-season physical examination and follow your doctor’s recommendations
  • Hydrate adequately — waiting until you are thirsty is often too late to hydrate properly
  • Maintain proper fitness — injury rates are higher in athletes who have not adequately prepared physically.
  • After a period of inactivity, progress gradually back to full-contact soccer through activities such as aerobic conditioning, strength training, and agility training.
  • Avoid overuse injuries — more is not always better!

 

Many sports medicine specialists believe that it is beneficial to take at least one season off each year. Try to avoid the pressure that is now exerted on many young athletes to over-train. Listen to your body and decrease training time and intensity if pain or discomfort develops. This will reduce the risk of injury and help avoid “burn-out”

Common soccer-related injuries

Ankle and Foot Fractures
There are many bones that can be fractured in the ankle and foot. Typical fractures that occur are to the fibula bone (avulsion fracture), metatarsal bone fractures and calcaneal fractures. Fractures are typically immobilized with casting or bracing. In severe cases surgery may be required to align and stabilize the bone with pins or plates.

After being immobile for a period of time whether from casting or surgery, the ankle and foot joints will become quite stiff. This loss of motion in the joint also causes discomfort and results in lost muscle strength in the ankle and foot.

How physical therapy helps
Physical therapy is very important in the rehabilitative process to help you regain normal range of motion, reduce swelling, resolve pain and regain function of your ankle and foot.
Physical therapy is gentle and will help you quickly resolve your pain while working with your doctor to follow protocol and restore your function. Improvement in range of motion, strength, stability, walking and running will occur. With physical therapy, you can make a complete recovery quickly and safely. Call us today to learn more how we can help you fully recover after a fracture.

Ankle Sprain / Strain
Ankle sprains are very common injuries and typically occur from improper footwear on uneven terrain. Most often, sprains occur from sports or trips over objects that were unseen. Sprains refer to injuries of the ligaments (connect bone to bone) and strains refer to injuries of the muscles or tendons (connect muscle to bone). Sprains and strains occur from quick over-stretching of the tissues causing micro-tearing and subsequent injury. Swelling begins as part of the inflammation process, causing pain and difficulty with movement.
The first step in treating sprains or strains in the ankle is to rest, ice and elevate it. Common sprains in the ankle occur on the outside of the ankle where 3 main ligaments attach. There are different levels of sprain or strain from mild to severe. With severe limitations in movement you should see your physical therapist right away. In some cases, the tearing can be complete and even be in need of surgical repair.

How physical therapy helps
In most cases, physical therapy can effectively help you recover from a sprain or strain. We first evaluate the injured area to determine the extent of the injury and ensure that the ligaments or tendons are still intact. We then formulate a treatment plan that will quickly relieve your swelling, pain and begin restoring range of motion.
The goal of physical therapy is to restore your normal range of motion and eventually restore normal strength. If you participate in sports or are very active, we will work closely with you to make sure that you fully recover and can participate in those activities you love to do. Call us today to discover how we can effectively treat your ankle sprain or strain.

Foot and Ankle Post-surgery Rehab
There are many different surgeries for the foot and ankle from fracture repairs to tissue repair from trauma. In addition, common surgeries such as bunionectomies, hammer toe, and even ankle fusions will require physical therapy.
After surgery, due to limited post-operative movement and inflammation from the surgery, your range of motion and strength will be diminished. The loss of strength and range of motion in the foot or ankle can cause many problems in daily life including difficulty standing for short periods of time and an inability to easily use a set of stairs. When you are unable to stand for periods of time or walk on your own it can result in lost work hours and financial loss. But with a skilled physical therapist working with you, you can get great results and return to previous activities without pain or loss of function.

How physical therapy helps
Physical therapy is an important part of the rehabilitative process after ankle or foot surgery. Depending on your surgery and surgical protocols, we will progress you through a structured physical therapy rehabilitation program. Our goal is to restore pain-free range of motion in the ankle or foot while maintaining surgical rehab protocols. Our highly skilled physical therapists will also work to improve your walking coordination, balance, and strength to ensure that you are able to return to normal pain-free walking and have the ability to easily traverse a set of stairs.

About Ankle instability
Ankle instability typically occurs after the ligaments in the ankle have stretched out, losing the normal stability of the bones in the ankle and foot. This can be a result of an injury or occur over a long period of time from poor foot positioning, bad shoe wear or genetic predisposition.

When there is ankle instability the probability of further ankle sprains increases significantly. While the ligaments themselves may not be able to shorten back to normal, the muscles supporting the ankle can be strengthened to take up the slack. This compensation allows for better stability in the ankle and foot with walking, running and sports. Bracing may also be needed depending on the severity of the instability.

How physical therapy helps
Our physical therapists work with different physicians, including podiatrists to rehabilitate ankle and foot injuries. By assessing your ankle and foot joint movements we can determine what areas need to be strengthening bringing support and stability to your ankle.

With years of training in analyzing and treating joint mechanics, walking and movement, we put together a custom treatment plan that will improve your ankle stability. Call us today to discover how we can help increase your ankle stability!

What is Calcaneal Apophysitis?

Calcaneal Apophysitis (aka. Sever’s Disease) is the most common cause of heel pain in children and adolescents.  It is a painful inflammation at the growth plate of the heel affecting children and adolescent’s between age 8 and 14 years old.  It is most common in athletes involved in track, soccer or baseketball due overuse and repetitive stress on the growth plate.  Obesity, a tight Achilles tendon, flat feet, high arches, changes in footwear and biomechanical problems may also contribute to this condition.

Symptoms include pain in the back or bottom of the heel, limping, walking on toes, difficulty running, jumping or participating in sports, and pain when the sides of the heel are squeezed.

 

How physical therapy helps

Physical therapy is the first line in conservative treatment for Calcaneal Apophysitis. Commonly, this condition is exacerbated by underlying abnormal mechanics of movement, walking and muscle weakness. Our trained physical therapists are experts in evaluating your movement to pinpoint the source of the trouble. Modalities may be used to alleviate pain and discomfort, while the Astym treatment can stimulate healing and hands-on therapy can improve joint mechanics and movement.

Finally, gentle strengthening exercises and joint coordination exercises help to restore stability to the affected area and prevent re-occurrence of symptoms. To discover how we can help your heel pain call us today!

 

What is Achilles Tendonitis?
Achilles tendonitis is an inflammation of the Achilles tendon that attaches your calf muscle to the back of your heel. Achilles tendonitis is typically caused by tightness in the hamstrings and calf muscles. In addition, limitations in ankle and foot range of motion can alter your walking pattern, putting excessive strain on the Achilles tendon, causing tendonitis.

Typically, the back of the ankle and heel is very painful to touch, especially after prolonged walking. Rest tends to help Achilles tendonitis while walking aggravates it.

How physical therapy helps
Physical therapy is one of the best treatment options for Achilles tendonitis. Our physical therapists will evaluate your leg, ankle and foot mobility, range of motion, strength, balance and walking patterns. This will help us discover the root cause of your pain and resolve that for long term results.

We focus on treatments to resolve your pain quickly, improve your joint mobility and strengthen muscles as needed. The result is the ability to walk and run without pain in the back of your heel returning to the activities you love to do.