Lukowiak-J

Last year I tore my patellar tendon and the doctor informed me of a long road ahead. I was initially sent to another rehab center by the doctor’s office. After several months, I couldn’t get any better. The doctor performed surgery to complete the repair. Then along comes Mike who asked to help me. When I came in, I could barely move my knee. His team took charge. They were incredible from start to finish. From Sara at the front desk, to Emily and Mike for pushing me back to form. 4.5 months after surgery I was back to skiing.  5 months I was back to running and playing soccer. All I can say is amazing things. I would recommend any here. You’re in great hands

- Jeff
Harty-A

I came to PT because I had pain in my heels due to my inflexibility in my hips and hamstrings. Since coming to PT I have dramatically reduced the pain in my heels and my flexibility has increased due to the great exercises I was shown. Now I can score more goals in soccer!

- Aidan

Washington Timbers Soccer

As the Exclusive Wellness Partners of the Washington Timbers Football Club, Peak Motion is prepared to help your athletes recovery from and prevent soccer-related injuries this season.  Be on the lookout for educational seminars for both coaches and parents on injury prevention, identification of common soccer related injuries and how to best recover from these injuries to minimize lost playing time or worsening of the injury.

 

Soccer Injury Prevention

Soccer is one of the most popular sports in the world and the fastest growing team sport in the United States. Although soccer provides an enjoyable form of aerobic exercise and helps develop balance, agility, coordination, and a sense of teamwork, soccer players must be aware of the risks for injury. Injury prevention, early detection, and treatment can keep kids and adults on the field long-term.

Injuries to the lower extremities are the most common in soccer. These injuries may be traumatic, such as a kick to the leg or a twist to the knee, or result from overuse of a muscle, tendon, or bone.

 

How to prevent soccer injuries

  • Have a pre-season physical examination and follow your doctor’s recommendations
  • Hydrate adequately — waiting until you are thirsty is often too late to hydrate properly
  • Maintain proper fitness — injury rates are higher in athletes who have not adequately prepared physically.
  • After a period of inactivity, progress gradually back to full-contact soccer through activities such as aerobic conditioning, strength training, and agility training.
  • Avoid overuse injuries — more is not always better!

 

Many sports medicine specialists believe that it is beneficial to take at least one season off each year. Try to avoid the pressure that is now exerted on many young athletes to over-train. Listen to your body and decrease training time and intensity if pain or discomfort develops. This will reduce the risk of injury and help avoid “burn-out”

Common soccer-related injuries